I Was Ready To Hire Someone

Posted by Ad Hustler | Posted in Doing Business | Posted on 20-09-2012

This whole hiring situation is laughable.  So, I was ready to hire someone that I saw some potential in.  I interviewed her a couple of days ago and gave her a call today.  The conversation went something like this

Me: Hi, this is Brandon calling from XYZ.  I know it’s short notice but would you mind swinging by the office today to talk for a few minutes? (she lives a few miles away)
Her: I can’t, i’m down in NYC
Me: OK, fair enough, well I was interested in offering you the position we discussed.  Are you still interested?
Her: Can I get back to you?
Me: Hmm, ok, are you thinking about taking a different position elsewhere?
Her: I may be.
Me: OK well let me know when you make up your mind and we can discuss it.
Her: OK, thanks

Is it strange that now, even if she called saying she wants the job, I would say no thanks?  I understand that I’m not the center of the universe but why invest time into someone who obviously isn’t 100% sure that what I’m offering is what she wants?  Why is this so painful?  I feel like outsourcing this work at this point!

What would you do if she said yes?

UPDATE: So after reading some of the comments and talking to some people I trust, I offered this girl the job on Friday.  What happened was, she called back, saying she wanted the job and wanted to know if it was still available.  I said yes.  She never asked about money which I thought was weird, she only asked how she should dress.  She told me she’d need to take off next Friday for “Homecoming.”  I said OK, you can start on Monday.  All was set.  I then got an email at 8:11pm Sunday night:

“Thank you for offering me the opportunity to work with XYZ. Unfortunately, after careful consideration, I have decided to decline the offer.
I don’t believe the position will be the best fit for me.”

Ad Hustler | Subscribe To Ad Hustler

Comments

  1. I don’t blame her. When I am searching for a job I am looking at all possible options. Honestly, I like you and your blog but I don’t think I would want to work for you based on these posts.

  2. I have been interviewing a lot this month to find the right fit and can definitely relate to your post. It is funny that people that want to get a good job actually end up hurting themselves with the unprofessional comments or demands that they make.

  3. If someone seems flaky, I usually look for someone different. Not saying that is the case here.

  4. @Spyderman I agree it is smart and okay to look through options but you have to be clear and professional about it not wishy washy.

  5. She sounds honest and reasonable to me. What’s yer prob?

    ” I understand that I’m not the center of the universe but”

    Do you really?

  6. At least she didn’t lie and say she wanted the job and then call at the last minute to tell you she was taking something else …

  7. I think you would be happiest with an employee who is passionate about working for your company. That person would jump at the chance if offered.

    Having said that, you need to look at your company and hiring process to see if you have an environment that people will be excited to spend their lives in. I suggest reading Dave Ramsey’s last book on leadership. He talks about hiring and team building a lot.

  8. @Paul – I like Dave Ramsey a lot and admit, I can use some more education on hiring so I may give that book a whirl. I do however think i’m a good judge of character and have chosen some very loyal people by my side as well.

    @Mike – Valid point

    I feel like if I interviewed for a job, I would know if I wanted that job or not. I would think that the only thing that could hold up a decision is 1 of 4 things.

    1) A significant other so I can definitely understand if someone were to say “let me talk to my wife and give you a call back” or something of that nature. I don’t believe that’s the case here.

    2) Money. Let’s say your offering someone less then they were expecting, they may have to think about it. She never asked what I was offering her (and I was going to be offering her more then double her last job). I think it’s super weird not to ask about money in the above conversation.

    3) There’s Another Job Your Considering: This is very possible in this case, but I think that she obviously wants the other job more because your risking losing this one by the time you get back to me by not committing. In this case what if the other job suddenly becomes open? I’m just out of luck then….after I spend a bunch of time training her and paying her?

    4) Your Just Not Sure: This one’s probably the worst because again she’s not going to be committed.

    That gives you a peak into my thinking process.

    Guys/Girls above….how many full-time employees do you have? Theory is a lot easier then doing this stuff in practice and dealing with the consequences of a bad hire. That’s why i’m not too easy going and willy nilly with this hire.

  9. It sounds to me like you want someone as committed to your business as you are. There are a reason people are employees and not business owners. It’s sounds like you want an owner/partner not an employee. Honestly, I’ve never been dedicated to any job I’ve had it was always just about the money and or benefits. If something better comes up then I’m gone in a heartbeat.

  10. Just came across your blog Mr. Hustler… where are you located? I might apply lol

  11. There are reasons you make the big bucks and they don’t, and you’re uncovering them.

  12. Reject her when she said, “I may be.” People who aren’t sure about themselves can do no good to your company. When you are building a team, you need a person to be confident when he speaks.

  13. if someone is looking for a job, that means they are looking for a job in more then one place.
    IF you think that person is a good catch, then you better make a good offer.
    Another thing, I’ll never pay a flat wage again, but make it possible for a motivated person to make more working for me then anyone else with incentives and bonus, and make it so a low performer won’t make much at all.

  14. I would be hesitant to give her a chance after a convo like that. Then again, maybe she just wasn’t able to really talk at the moment. I’d give her 24 hours to get back to me, otherwise, she’s just not a professional person.

  15. @adhustler Your point about not interviewing for jobs you don’t know you want, how would you really know until you do the interview and hear what it’s really all about? A job listing is generally very glowingly in favor of the job and it’s not until you discuss the finer details that you get an understanding of how it would apply to you…

    That’s in my own personal experience though. I feel your pain though, having interviewed thousands of people in my old job, you kind of have to just move on to the next candidate and not take it personal…

  16. @Jon – I left her a message and this conversation was on the callback.

    @Dave – I think your misinterpreting my story a little. I agree you don’t really know what a job is until you interview. After she interviewed she sent a followup email thanking me for the interview, explaining that she would be a perfect fit for the job and even sending me some samples of her work to clarify a question that I asked her in the interview. So based on that, I assumed she was interested after the interview.

  17. UPDATE: So after reading some of the comments and talking to some people I trust, I offered this girl the job on Friday. What happened was, she called back, saying she wanted the job and wanted to know if it was still available. I said yes. She never asked about money which I thought was weird, she only asked how she should dress. She told me she’d need to take off next Friday for “Homecoming.” I said OK, you can start on Monday. All was set. I then got an email at 8:11pm Sunday night:

    “Thank you for offering me the opportunity to work with XYZ. Unfortunately, after careful consideration, I have decided to decline the offer.
    I don’t believe the position will be the best fit for me.”

  18. Can’t really blame her. Sounded like she was considering other options anyways. If she was that thrilled about the job you offered, she would have been jumping all over it. Considering she didn’t ask about money, my guess is your offer was her Plan B.

  19. @Phil – I agree, that’s why I was hesitant. Who wants to be plan B?

  20. Well it turns out you were right. I don’t blame her for taking the position she felt was better and using you as a plan b. Still sucks from your end. I actually accepted an offer 3 times only to later decline all 3 times. I actually didn’t expect to be offered the position after declining the first time but they offered again. In the end I ended up using the offer as leverage to get a raise. I can see how this would be frustrating to the business owner, but it’s not personal it’s just business. I will also say I have never tackled this problem from the employer side.

  21. Can’t blame her though, she must have had other choices.

  22. Yea, usually when people there is something off from the beginning, I stay away. You make people do what you want. You can only align your interests with theirs. For example, students are always looking to build their resumes. Show how you can help them more to make yourself attractive in ways other than hourly pay.

  23. Please help me sir my facebook account bloucked I’m trying to identify photos that don’t any ans way m so angry with sadness becoz my cute frnds and my family members are lost please help me

Post a comment